The Substance of Faith

The Substance of Faith

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Seven Conversations – Part 2

Best Parenting Books

I recently taught the Seven Conversations approach at my home church.  I promised a list of the parenting books I find most helpful.   So here they are.  Each one has played a part in developing Seven Conversations.

Privilege = Danger

First is Madeline Levine’s The Price of Privilege.   Levine explains clearly how families can be over involved in the wrong areas of a child’s life, while simultaneously being under involved in critical areas.  Most parents confuse the the two.   This book first pointed me to research on the importance of families sharing meals.

 

 

How Children Succeed

The second book is Paul Tough’s How Children Succeed.  You can follow the link to my initial review of the book.  Tough showed me the importance of delayed gratification as a critical component of a child’s development.

The Best Business School Book for Parents

The next book is a business book.  Yet, writing as a professor at Harvard’s business school doesn’t stop Clayton Christensen from pointing out the power of conversations with our children.  He also makes it clear how important it is  to do things on our own and to be a person of integrity.   How Will You Measure Your Life is the only “parenting” book I’ve given both my daughters.  

Another Book on the Danger of Privilege

A book that is out of print, but very helpful, is Lee Hausner’s Children of Paradise.  Like Levine’s book, it is about raising healthy, responsible children in upper middle class families.   An important note:  in Levine’s work, she defined wealthy families as those with a household income of more than $75,000.  Before you dismiss Levine or Hausner as not applicable to your life, consider that fact for a few moments.  Hausner reminds us children have to do things for themselves to develop healthy self-esteem.  

For Healthy Sportsmanship

For anything about healthy sportsmanship, the guru is Bruce Eamon Brown.  His books are typically short and readable.  He writes for parents of athletes and for coaches.   Don’t put a child in sports or take on a team to coach until you read one of his books.  The book to the left is $5.00 on Kindle.  It’s a small investment, considering all the time our children participate in sports.

 

There are other good parenting books out there, but these provide a solid background for the type of parenting that produces character.   And, as participants in Seven Conversations can attest, the right kind of character produces the quality of life we pray our children will have.  

 


 

 

 

 

 

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Seven Conversations

 

I’ve never been on Facebook.  I’m one of the few Ludites left who is concerned about privacy.  Therefore, I’ve not seen firsthand the interest in one of my sermons on parenting that has resurfaced.  I appreciate the kind words that have been forwarded about it

Based on that sermon, several  parents have asked, “What are the questions to ask our children?”   Since I entered retirement, I’ve been working on a book about this idea.  The current title is Seven Conversations.  I won’t try to preview the whole book here but in response to texts and emails, here are the basics:

How can we wait? Teaches delayed gratification.

How can you do that yourself?  Teaches independence.

What shall we eat? Invites the family to a common table.

What are we thankful for?  Teaches gratitude.

What shall we give? Teaches generosity.

What shall we pray for?  Instills faith.

I’ll save the seventh as a tease.  I’ll get to another post soon to explain why these questions and qualities are important.

If you are interested in more about parenting, scroll right and read my post “The Lottery,” if you dare.


 

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